How To Take Back Control Of Your Day

Social distancing doesn’t mean we can’t socialise

Two weeks before social distancing became a thing, I stepped out from work during lunch break. While walking, I thought of how great it must feel to be able to go for a walk at any time of the day. To have that choice. To be able to make that choice and see it through.

We can still make choices now, many of which we can’t implement. The world as we knew it has changed. Our days have turned into nights. Our nights have turned into days. Somehow, we’re expected to work from home and realize the same output as we did in the office. This can leave us with a lot of guilt when we are in our houses but underperforming.

 

Realize That You’re Not Working From Home

You’re escaping a crisis and a pandemic by choosing to stay home. Whether by choice or because it’s mandatory. I recently came across a tweet that I thought I should share for anyone feeling a bit guilty.

You’re not working from home; you’re at home during a crisis trying to work.~ Twitter User.

Most of us are used to working from home and have no problem with achieving results. Writers, freelancers, introverts, and homebodies thought that it’s going to be business as usual for them. Until we realized, it’s not business as usual and our days are too long.

Here’s how you can take back control of your day:

Have Three Items on Your To-Do List Every Day

This will save you from feeling like a spectator in your own life and the guilt that comes with it. For example, my three goals each day are to write something, read something, and tweet something.

They’re not achieved in the order in which they’re listed or one after another. But they get achieved every day. Sometimes I read a book or a couple of Medium posts which I share on Twitter.

Other times I read recommendations from other writers. The idea here is to have some kind of input and output activities in your day.

Leave Your Bed and Make Your Bed

Staying in bed is very tempting especially when your city is in lockdown. Not only is this bad for your mental health but for your physical health as well.

 

For example, a week into social distancing I developed muscle ache. Everything hurt. I had gone from being super active and exercising to curling up in bed or sitting at my desk for too long. So I started doing yoga and it’s been helping with my mental health, my writing, and my physical health.

Making your bed also signifies to your brain that it’s time to shift to other activities.

Take a Shower

Now that social distancing and staying at home has messed up with my circadian clock, waking and showering happen at different times. No single day is similar to the next day.

I might wake up and shower at 5 am, 10 am, 8 am or 9 am. I am trying not to have a certain time in which certain things ought to be done. It releases me from the guilt of not having certain things at a specific time. For me, things happen and get done when I wake up. Doesn’t matter when, but they get done.

 

I recommend taking a shower as it leaves you fresh and motivates you to be active. I mainly take two showers a day. One in the morning and one in the evening. However, one is enough. Depending on how this crisis pans out, I’m going to have to go back to one shower a day like most people or have one hot and one cold to save on the electricity bill.

 

Call a Friend or a Family Member On a Daily Basis

I recommend talking to your family, friends and fellow writers each day. This will give you the motivation you need right now, especially if you’re working from home.

I always call my favourite colleague from work so we can catch up and discuss current events and that seems to be working. Just because we’re social distancing doesn’t mean we can’t socialise

This post first appeared in Publishous.

 

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