Book Review: Think And Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

After listening to so many financial podcasts, I finally read and finished Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill. I give this book a 10 out of 10 as it awakened in me the need to deal with my procrastination, limiting beliefs, and self-sabotaging. I’m rereading some chapters as we speak. The book also addresses the power of faith and positive thinking, and how our thoughts transmute themselves into their physical equivalent.

 

It was hard to pick momentum when I first started as I felt like I was in the 1800s and not in a good way. The first chapters, to me, felt like the book was addressing someone living in the 1800s. However, I did pick momentum and I have been reading a chapter or 2 pages a day before starting my day. I finished the book, and I’m wondering what I should pick next

 

Book: Think And Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

Pages: 174

Goodreads Synopsis

Think and Grow Rich is a motivational personal development and self-help book written by Napoleon Hill and inspired by a suggestion by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie. While the title implies that this book deals with only how to get rich, the author explains that the philosophy taught in the book can be used to help people succeed in all lines of work and to do or be almost anything they want.

 

Inspirational And Encouraging Quotes From The Book

When riches begin to come they come so quickly, in such great abundance, that one wonders where they have been hiding all those lean years.

 

Every person who wins in any undertaking must be willing to burn his ships and cut all sources of retreat.

 

The bird waits in the egg, and in the highest vision of the soul, a waking angel stirs.

 

Any impulse of thought which is repeatedly passed on to the subconscious mind is, finally, accepted and acted upon by the subconscious mind, which proceeds to translate that impulse into its physical equivalent, by the most practical procedure available.

 

Do not wait for a definite plan, through which you intend to exchange services or merchandise in return for the money you are visualizing, but begin at once to see yourself in possession of the money, DEMANDING and EXPECTING  meanwhile, that your subconscious mind will hand over the plan, or plans you need.

Perhaps a favourable break can get one an opportunity but the safest plan is not to depend on luck.

 

Failure permits no alibis.

 

Temporary defeat should mean only one thing, the certain knowledge that there’s something wrong in your plan.

 

Without a sense of fairness and justice, no leader can command and retain the sense of respect of his followers.

 

The relationship of employer and employee, or of leader and follower in the future, will be one of mutual cooperation based upon an equitable division of the profits of business.

 

The leader who fears that one of his followers may take his position is practically sure to realize that fear sooner or later.

 

The efficient leader leads by encouraging and not by trying to instil fear into the hearts of his followers.

 

When the debris of the depression shall have been cleared away, and business shall have been once again restored to balance, both employers and employees will recognize that they’re no longer privileged to drive bargains at the expense of those whom they serve.

 

The quality and quantity of service rendered, and the spirit in which it is rendered, determine to a large extent the price, and the duration of the employment.

 

The person who takes no chances generally has to take whatever is left when others are done choosing.

 

It is one thing to want money, it is something entirely different to be worth more.

 

I hope these inspirational words of encouragement from think and grow rich encourage you to pick up the book.

 

This Article Was Edited By Grammarly.

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  1. Pingback: Book Review: As A Man Thinketh - Nderi Sarah Blog

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